Manoj Mate

Visiting Professor of Law
Manoj Mate

Expertise:

Constitutional Law, International and Comparative Law, International Trade Law, Globalization, Empirical Legal Studies, Law and Society

Background:

Professor Mate is a scholar in the areas of constitutional law, comparative constitutional law and judicial politics, international trade law, and public law in South Asia. His research draws on interdisciplinary methods in the fields of law and society and political science. He teaches in the areas of constitutional law, civil procedure, international and comparative law, and election law.

His current research focuses on how constitutional courts entrench constitutionalism, secularism, and democratic norms; free speech and protest rights; regulation of electoral speech; a book project on the empowerment of the Supreme Court of India in rights and governance; and international trade law and development.

His academic writings have been published in law reviews and journals including the Tulane Law ReviewColumbia Human Rights Law ReviewBerkeley Journal of International Law, George Washington International Law Review, the Journal of Human Rights, and in peer-reviewed chapters in volumes published by Oxford University Press and Cambridge University Press. Professor Mate is the Chair of the Association of American Law Schools' (AALS) Section on Comparative Law and also serves on the executive board of the AALS Section on Law and South Asian Studies.

Prior to joining UC Irvine, Professor Mate was a Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School’s East Asian Legal Studies Program during the 2017-2018 year, and previously taught as a Visiting Associate Professor at the University of California Berkeley, School of Law, and as a Professor of Law and Political Science at Whittier College School of Law.  He previously served as a Mellon Sawyer Fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Society at Berkeley as part of the Mellon Sawyer Seminar, The Dilemmas of Judicial Power: Constitutional Courts, Politics, and Society, and as a Research Fellow in Global Comparative Law at UC Berkeley School of Law.  Mate received his Ph.D in Political Science at UC Berkeley, and his J.D. from Harvard Law School.  He received his B.A. in Political Science, with highest honors, from UC Berkeley, where he was the recipient of the Department Citation in Political Science.  Prior to law teaching, Professor Mate practiced in litigation at O'Melveny & Myers, and later practiced election law at a political law firm in San Francisco, California.  He also served as Senior Policy Advisor to San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro for energy, sustainability, and health policy.

Current Courses:

Procedural Analysis (Fall 2018)

International Legal Analysis (Spring 2019); The Supreme Court and Public Policy (Spring 2019)

  • The Globalization Law Trade Gap, to be presented at Trade and Investment Across Asia,   Joint Program of AALS Section on Law and South Asian Studies, and AALS Section on Comparative Law, January 2019.
  • Presenter, Comparative Constitutional Law and Judicial Politics, AALS Section on Comparative Law Program, Annual Meeting of the American Association of Law Schools, New Orleans, Louisiana, January 2019.
  • Free Speech and Protest Rights, to be presented at “The NFL National Anthem Controversy”, Western Law Professors of Color and Conference of Asian Pacific Law Faculty, UNLV Boyd School of Law, October 19-20, 2018.
  • Chair, Global Trends in Election Law: Comparative Perspectives, Comparative Law and South Asian Studies Joint Program, Annual Meeting of the American Association of Law Schools, San Diego, California, January 4, 2018.
  • Global Solar Trade Wars and the WTO, presented at U.C. Irvine School of Law Faculty Workshop, Irvine, California, November 8, 2017.
  • Comparative Constitutional Law and Indigenous Rights in Canada: Insights from India, presented at “Rewriting the Canadian Constitution” conference, The Clough Center for the Study of Constitutional Democracy, Boston College School of Law, October 19, 2017.
  • Global Solar Trade Wars and the WTO, presented at Harvard Law School East Asian Legal Studies Workshop, Cambridge, Massachusetts, October 16, 2017.
  • Judicial Power and Constitutional Transformation in India, presented at the University of California at Berkeley, School of Law, April 2017.
  • Reconceptualizing Judicial Supremacy, presented at the Fourth Annual Southern California International Law Scholars Workshop, University of Southern California, Gould School of Law, February 10, 2017.
  • Chair, Comparative Constitutional Law in South Asia: Sources, Methods, and Applications, Annual Meeting of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS), San Francisco, California, January 6, 2017.
  • Chair, Fundamental Rights and Constitutional Transitions in South Asia, Annual Meeting of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS), San Francisco, California, January 7, 2017.
  • The Elite Intellectual Origins of Judicial Empowerment, presented at panel, “Comparative Constitutionalism”, 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia, PA, September 2016.
  • Discussant, Contesting Legitimacy: Legal Mobilization, Political Power, and Moral Order in Comparative Contexts, 2016 Annual Meeting of the Law and Society Association, New Orleans, Louisiana, June 2, 2016.
  • Fundamental Rights and Obergefell, presented at Roundtable: LGBTQ Politics Post-Obergefell at 2016 Annual Meeting of the Western Political Science Association, San Diego, California, March 25, 2016.
  • Neoliberal Religiosity in the Secular State in Turkey and India (with Seval Yildirim), presented at:
    • Southern California International Law Scholars (SCILS) workshop, UCLA School of Law, February 6, 2016 
    • “Courts and Economic Rights in a Neoliberal Age,” 2015 Annual Meeting of the Law and Society Association, Seattle, Washington, May 30, 2015.
  • Neoliberalism and Development in India, presented at “Imagining Alternatives: Progressive Economics & Social Movements”, Occidental College, February 6, 2016.
  • Participant, APALSA Election Law Panel, U.C. Irvine School of Law, November 13, 2015.
  • Commentator, Fragile Democracies: Contested Power in the Era of Constitutional Courts (by Samuel Issacharoff, NYU Law), at Center for Democracy Development and the Rule of Law (CDDRL) Workshop , Stanford University, November 5, 2015.
  • India’s Participatory Model, presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Law Schools, Comparative Law Session: "Comparative Law Expanded: Methodology and Public Law in Nontraditional Comparative Legal Systems" (one of two papers selected from call for papers), January 2015.
  • American Association of Law Schools, Comparative Law Section, Chair, 2018-
  • American Association of Law Schools, Law and South Asian Studies Section, Chair, 2017-2018
  • Best Paper Prize, Human Rights Section, American Political Science Association (2009).
  • Ford Foundation Visiting Fellowship, Centre for the Study of Law and Governance, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India (2006).
  • Honorable Mention, National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship Program (2005).